U.S. Customs Computer Shutdown Ties Up LAX, Other Airports


Controversial $9 Billion Security Plan Unveiled for LAX

A problem with the U.S. Customs and Border Protection computer system created long lines at Los Angeles International Airport as well as at other airports around the country, officials said. Systems were reportedly back up and running by 2:44 p.m. PT.

Earlier, passengers at several major airports around the country got caught in the chaos after the entire U.S. Customs computer system failed Friday afternoon.

“CBP systems are experiencing an issue which appears to be impacting multiple airports including LAX,” airport officials tweeted Friday afternoon. “Officers are processing passengers manually so please check with your airline for the latest status of any flight impacts. More details as they become available.”

Staff members were deployed through the customs area to help direct guests and provide any other assistance, officials added.

Other airports in the nation, including John F. Kennedy Airport in New York and Dulles International Airport near Washington, D.C., also experienced problems getting through customs because of the computer failure, according to posts from social media users at those two airports.

Officials with the U.S. Customs and Border Protection confirmed the computer systems were having issues on Twitter:

“CBP is experiencing a temporary outage with its processing systems at various air ports of entry & is taking immediate action to address the technology disruption. CBP officers continue to process international travelers using alternative procedures until systems are back online.

“CBP officers are working to process travelers as quickly as possible while maintaining the highest levels of security,” officials said.

Officials with CBP were discussing the possibility of a cyber attack against their system, according to a report from TMZ. However, one source told the website that there was "no indication of nefarious activity at this time."

Still, officials aren't sure why the system failed.

Photo: Getty Images


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