Magnitude-4.4 Earthquake Strikes Near La Verne

posted by City News Service - 

LA VERNE (CNS) - One of the first questions you're likely to be asked today will be “did you feel it?” -- a magnitude-4.4 earthquake that struck north of La Verne.

The earthquake struck at 7:33 p.m. Tuesday about three miles north of La Verne at a depth of 3.7 miles, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

It was felt at police headquarters in downtown Los Angeles and in Glendale, Lakewood, other parts of Los Angeles County and Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, Kern and San Diego counties.

A resident in Lakewood reported a “real sharp and fast” shaking.

The USGS reported that a second quake, with a magnitude of 3.4, struck near the same area about a minute after the first.

There were no reports of damage in Los Angeles or La Verne, police in both cities said.

A Los Angeles County Fire Department dispatch supervisor said the department had received no reports of damage or injuries.

A check of Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department critical facilities showed no signs of damage, authorities said.

No damage or injuries were reported in Pasadena, police there said.

Police and fire departments dispatched personnel to check for damage.

Seismologist Lucy Jones said the quake should not be expected to have done damage to structures.

Jones said the quake, felt as far away as Bakersfield and Oceanside, was not on the Sierra Madre fault, one of the largest in the region, but on an ancillary structure.

The earthquake was the largest in Southern California since Dec. 29, 2015, when a magnitude-4.3 quake struck near Devore, in San Bernardino County, Jones said.

A 5.1-magnitude earthquake struck in La Habra on March 28, 2014.

“This is a very ordinary earthquake for California, the size that we have several times a year somewhere in the state,” Jones said.

More than a dozen small aftershocks were felt and as is always the case, there was about a 5 percent the largest magnitude-4.4 earthquake would be followed by a bigger one, Jones said.

Photo: USGS

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