A Voter Guide to Today's Primary in California


Californians head to the polls to vote in the June 5 primary

Today Californians head to the polls to vote in the June 5th primary that will determine a host of issues, including who we will see on the General Ballot for several statewide offices. 

Polls are open between 7 a.m. and 8 p.m. today. Find your polling location here:  lavote.net/LOCATOR/

You can also text VOTECA to 90975 to find your voting location. 

Governor's Race

Gov. Jerry Brown, who has served as California's governor twice - first between 1975 and 1983, and again when he was re-elected in 2011. But, he has termed out, which means it's California's first open Governor's seat in several years. 

That's attracted a huge field of candidates - 27 at last count. Here's a sampling of the top five in the running:

Gavin Newsom (D) - Lt. Governor/Businessman

Newsom has worked as California's Lieutenant Gov. since 2011 and before that, acted as San Francisco's mayor from 2004 to 2011 - the city's youngest in over 100 years. 

Antonio Villaraigosa (D) - Public Policy Adviser

Villaraigosa is another former mayor, formerly serving the city of Los Angeles from 2005 to 2013. 

John Cox (R) - Businessman/Taxpayer Advocate

Cox, a recent transplant to California, is running for governor as a businessman and taxpayer advocate. The Chicago native has been endorsed by President Trump and has run for office multiple times, including a bid for President in 2008. 

Travis Allen (R) - California Assemblyman

Allen has served as a Republican member of the California legislature since assuming office in 2012. He represents California's 72nd State Assembly district, which includes the cities of Fountain Valley, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, Westminster and most of Garden Grove. 

John Chiang (D) - California State Treasurer

Chiang has served as California's State Treasurer since 2015, and before that, acted as the 31st Controller of California. 

What's the deal with Propositions? 

There are five ballot initiatives you'll see at the voting booth today. From investing money into parks, to locking up revenue from last year's gas tax increase, here's a quick rundown of the issues you'll see at the ballot box today. 

Proposition 69

Proposition 68: Investing $4.1 Billion in Parks and Water Supply

California wants to sell up to $4.1 billion in bonds to help fund improvements to our parks and water systems. 

But instead of creating massive projects, Prop 68 seeks to work on smaller, local parks in several of California's cash-strapped cities. The money would go to protect and clean up bodies of water located in the middle of cities and suburban areas. 

Roughly a third of the money ($1.3 billion) will go to improving local and state parks. Another third ($1.2 billion) will go toward conserving and protecting the state's natural resources. The last third ($1.6 billion) is dedicated to anti-flood measures, waterway cleanups, as well as ensuring Californians have access to clean drinking water. 

A YES Vote Means: 

A YES vote on this measure means: The state could sell $4.1 billion in general obligation bonds to fund various natural resources-related programs such as for habitat conservation, parks, and water-related projects.

A NO Vote Means: 

A NO vote on this measure means: The state could not sell $4.1 billion in general obligation bonds to fund various natural resources- related programs.

Proposition 69: A 'Lockbox' for Transportation Revenue

Last year, Gov. Jerry Brown and the state legislature passed an increase in the gas tax and a one-time increase on vehicle registration fees in order to raise money to fix roads and infrastructure across Calfiornia. 

This ballot measure would create a 'lockbox' that would prevent legislators from using the money for projects other than repairing roads and improving transportation infrastructure.  

A YES Vote Means: 

A YES vote on this measure means: The Legislature will be required under the State Constitution to continue to spend revenues from recently enacted fuel taxes and vehicle fees on transportation purposes (such as repairing roads and improving transit).

A No Vote Means: 

A NO vote on this measure means: The Legislature in the future could change current law, allowing it to spend a portion of the revenues from recently enacted fuel taxes and vehicle fees on purposes other than transportation.

Proposition 70

Proposition 70: Controlling Cap-and-Trade Revenue

This is a ballot measure that sprang out of delicate negotiations between Gov. Jerry Brown and both Republicans and Democrats in the legislature over the future of the state's cap-and-trade program. 

Brown wanted to extend the cap-and-trade auction auction system for carbon credits through 2030. But, legislators disagreed with the governor on how the revenue should be spent. 

Prop 70 would require the legislature come together in a two-thirds majority vote in each chamber of the California State Legislature in order to use any revenue raised by the auction of greenhouse gas emissions. The money would be placed in a reserve fund, untouchable by legislators starting in 2024. 

A Yes Vote Means:

A "yes" vote supports this amendment to require a one-time two-thirds vote in each chamber of the state legislature in 2024 or thereafter to pass a spending plan for revenue from the state's cap-and-trade program for greenhouse gases.

A No Vote Means:

A "no" vote opposes this amendment to require a one-time two-thirds vote in each legislative chamber in 2024 or thereafter to pass a spending plan for revenue from the state's cap-and-trade program.

Proposition 70

Proposition 71: Setting a specific date for when ballot initiatives take effect if passed. 

This is one of those 'housekeeping' ballot initiatives that aims to cut down on the chaos of elections when it comes to ballot iniatives Californians vote on. 

As it currently stands, if propositions pass, they immediately take effect. Prop 71 changes that by setting the date for all ballot propositions that pass to take effect five days after the Secretary of State certifies the election. 

Kevin Mullin, an state Assemblymember who represents San Mateo says, the quirk in the state's constitution could theoretically cause major confusion. 

"This really is preventative, given the vote-by-mail environment and voting results happening later after election day," said Mullin. 

What it DOES

Provides that ballot measures approved by a majority of voters shall take effect five days after the Secretary of State certifies the results of the election. Fiscal Impact: Likely little or no effect on state and local finances.

What a YES Vote Means

A YES vote on this measure means: Most state ballot measures (also called propositions) would take effect after the statewide vote has been counted and certified—about six weeks after Election Day.

What a NO Vote Means

A NO vote on this measure means: Most state ballot measures would continue to take effect the day after Election Day.

Prop 72

Proposition 72 - Setting up rainwater capture systems won't raise your taxes

Next is an issue most homeowners don't think about when it comes to saving water. If passed, people wouldn't be taxed for adding a rainwater capture system to their homes. 

State Senator Steve Glazer says it's been nice working on this issue because it's a rare case of everyone agreeing at once that this is a good idea. 

"We have Republicans and Democrats, business, labor, and environmentalists all saying that this is a good idea and should have happened a long time ago, we hope it happens now. It's nice, because we're living in a pretty polarized political world," said Glazer. 

Glazer adds his biggest fear right now is that people will just check the 'no' box without reading what the prop is actually about.

What it DOES

Permits Legislature to allow construction of rain-capture systems, completed on or after January 1, 2019, without requiring property-tax reassessment. Fiscal Impact: Probably minor reduction in annual property tax revenues to local governments.

What a YES Vote Means

A YES vote on this measure means: Installing a system to collect and store rainwater on a property could not result in a higher property tax bill.

What a NO Vote Means

A NO vote on this measure means: Installing a system to collect and store rainwater on a property could result in a higher property tax bill.

Photos: Getty Images


Sponsored Content

Sponsored Content