Propositioned - Props 71 & 72:


Welcome to Propositioned, an in-depth look at the various propositions you'll find on your ballot when you head to the voting booth on June 5th! 

Hosted by Kris Ankarlo, the podcast seeks to help voters understand what's at stake with each ballot iniativie placed on the ballot by voters or the legislature. 

Today's episode deals with Propositions 71 & 72, a pair of issues so non-controversial, neither one has any organized opposition to them. 

Proposition 71

First up, is a ballot that aims to cut down on the chaos by setting the date all ballot propositions will take effect. Right now, ballot initiatives that are passed immediately become law. Proposition 71 changes that by setting the date to five days after the Secretary of State certifies the election. 

Kevin Mullin, an state Assemblymember who represents San Mateo says, the quirk in the state's constitution could theoretically cause major confusion. 

"This really is preventative, given the vote-by-mail environment and voting results happening later after election day," said Mullin. 

What it DOES

Provides that ballot measures approved by a majority of voters shall take effect five days after the Secretary of State certifies the results of the election. Fiscal Impact: Likely little or no effect on state and local finances.

What a YES Vote Means

A YES vote on this measure means: Most state ballot measures (also called propositions) would take effect after the statewide vote has been counted and certified—about six weeks after Election Day.

What a NO Vote Means

A NO vote on this measure means: Most state ballot measures would continue to take effect the day after Election Day.

Proposition 72

Next is an issue most homeowners don't think about when it comes to saving water. If passed, people wouldn't be taxed for adding a rainwater capture system to their homes. 

State Senator Steve Glazer says it's been nice working on this issue because it's a rare case of everyone agreeing at once that this is a good idea. 

"We have Republicans and Democrats, business, labor, and environmentalists all saying that this is a good idea and should have happened a long time ago, we hope it happens now. It's nice, because we're living in a pretty polarized political world," said Glazer. 

Glazer adds his biggest fear right now is that people will just check the 'no' box without reading what the prop is actually about.

What it DOES

Permits Legislature to allow construction of rain-capture systems, completed on or after January 1, 2019, without requiring property-tax reassessment. Fiscal Impact: Probably minor reduction in annual property tax revenues to local governments.

What a YES Vote Means

A YES vote on this measure means: Installing a system to collect and store rainwater on a property could not result in a higher property tax bill.

What a NO Vote Means

A NO vote on this measure means: Installing a system to collect and store rainwater on a property could result in a higher property tax bill.


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