Scientists to study Vegas shooter's brain


The brain of Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock will be sent to Stanford University for a months-long examination, after a visual inspection during an autopsy found no abnormalities.

Doctors will examine the brain tissue to see if it had any neurological problems. It's scheduled to arrive at Stanford soon, and researchers have been instructed to spare no expense for the work.

Experts will try to determine if 64-year-old Paddock suffered from health problems such as strokes, blood vessel diseases, tumors, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, degenerative disorders, physical trauma and infections.

If a disease is found, experts say it would be false science to conclude that it caused Paddock to commit the massacre, even if it does ease people's minds. Brian Peterson, president of the National Association of Medical Examiners and chief coroner of Wisconsin's Milwaukee County, said:

"There's a difference between association and causality, and just because you have anything, doesn't mean it does anything."

Investigators are still struggling to come up with a motivation behind the senseless and brutal attack that left 58 dead and hundreds more wounded.

One things for certain, the Paddocks had something seriously wrong with their brains. The father was a criminal wanted by the FBI, Stephen Paddock killed 58 people, and Bruce Paddock just got busted for child porn.

Click here to read more at ABC Online.


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