Propositioned on Prop 20 - DNA and Criminal Justice Are On The Ballot


One of the propositions before voters this year could mean more DNA samples in the criminal database. If Proposition 20 passes, it would change what's considered a violent crime.

Here's what your vote means:

A "yes" vote supports this initiative to add crimes to the list of violent felonies for which early parole is restricted; recategorize certain types of theft and fraud crimes as wobblers (chargeable as misdemeanors or felonies); and require DNA collection for certain misdemeanors.

A "no" vote opposes this initiative to add crimes to the list of violent felonies for which early parole is restricted; recategorize certain types of theft and fraud crimes as wobblers (chargeable as misdemeanors or felonies); and require DNA collection for certain misdemeanors.

If passed, this would limit access to parole programs that have been established for non-violent offenders who have completed the full term of their primary offense by eliminating eligibility for certain offenses. It would also change the standards and requirements governing parole decisions under this program. The bill also authorizes felony charges for specified theft crimes currently chargeable only as misdemeanors, including some theft crimes where the value is between $250 and $950.

Finally, this would also require any persons convicted of specified misdemeanors to submit to collection of DNA samples for state database.

KFI's Kris Ankarlo spoke with both sides of the issue to help us get a better understanding about what your vote on Prop 20 would mean.

Guests:

Lizzie Buchen, Criminal Justice Program Director, ACLU Northern California

Diana Becton, Contra Costa District Attorney

Ron Lawrence, Citrus Heights Police Chief, Immediate Past President California Police Chiefs Association

Ron Hernandez, President, Association of Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs

Photo: Getty Images