How COVID-19 Is Changing Our Conversations About Money


We all worry about money from time to time -- but ever since the coronavirus pandemic began, financial stress has taken a whole new meaning...

For proof, look no further than a March 2020 survey by the U.S. Bank Women and Wealth Insights Study: Of 3,000 men and women investors with minimum investable assets of $25,000, the study found that "47 percent of the women associated negative words like “fear, “anxiety,” “inadequacy” and “dread” with financial planning, compared with 31 percent of men."

So, yeah... we're definitely worrying about money!

But COVID-19 hasn't only changed how we worry about our finances, it's also changed how we talk about them... especially with a partner.

An article published in September by the New York Times looked into just that -- how Covid has altered the conversation about money between couples, and how some women feel they can no longer let their husbands deal with their families fiscal matters alone.

Did you know that 18% of couples are on a single income?

So if one person loses their job, it will eventually become very clear if anyone in the relationship is hoarding money or hiding debt... That's why Dr. Wendy Walsh says ethical investing is SO important!

Mary Naber is the president and founder of Sage Stone Wealth Management, an independent SEC registered investment advisory firm of Harvard Economics graduates. She specializes in ethical investing, and is highlighted in over half a dozen books, and multiple magazines. And today, she joined Dr. Wendy on air to dive deeper into how the pandemic has altered our money conversations.

Listen below!

Visit the New York Times to read more.