Museum Of Tolerance To Observe International Holocaust Remembrance Day


Museum Of Tolerance To Observe International Holocaust Remembrance Day

LOS ANGELES (CNS) - The Museum of Tolerance will observe the International Day of Commemoration in Memory of the Victims of the Holocaust today with a program including the screening of a documentary and the first reading of a children's book about Anne Frank.

The new documentary “Who Will Write Our History” will be screened at 10 a.m. as part of a simultaneous screening at more than 200 venues globally followed by a discussion from UNESCO headquarters in Paris between the filmmakers and historians.

“Who Will Write Our History” documents how a secret band of journalists, scholars and community leaders worked to smuggle reports of atrocities in the Warsaw Ghetto to the outside world and preserve its record for future generations.

“The Cat Who Lived with Anne Frank” will have its first reading at 2:30 p.m. by Zoe Lister-Jones, a cast member of the CBS comedy “Life in Pieces.” The book tells Anne Frank's story from the point of view of Mouschi, the cat who lived with the Frank family in the Secret Annex in Amsterdam during World War II.

The family event will also include a presentation by the book's authors, David Lee Miller and Steven Jay Rubin, a gallery of art from the book, musical performances and arts and crafts making for youngsters.

The book will be published Feb. 5.

Holocaust survivors are scheduled to speak at noon, 1 p.m., 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. Each talk is approximately one hour.

International Day of Commemoration in Memory of the Victims of the Holocaust was established by a United Nations resolution adopted in 2005 and comes on the anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz death camp by Soviet troops.

“On International Holocaust Remembrance Day, we hold in our hearts the memory of every man, woman, and child who was abused, tortured or murdered during the Holocaust,” President Donald Trump said in a message issued Sunday.

“To remember these men and women -- those who perished and those who survived -- is to strive to prevent such suffering from happening again. Any denial or indifference to the horror of this chapter in the history of humankind diminishes all men and women everywhere and invites repetition of this great evil.

“We remain committed to the post-Holocaust imperative, `Never Again. `Never Again' means not only remembering -- in a profound and lasting way -- the evils of the Holocaust, but it also means remembering the individual men and women in this nation, and throughout the world, who have devoted their lives to the preservation and security of the Jewish people and to the betterment of all mankind.”


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