In another attempt to fix the PR nightmare that was United Airline's life this month, the company has issued a new policy that requires crew members to pre-book themselves before boarding the cabin.

The company says they will now require all commuting staff and crew to check into the flights at least 60 minutes prior to take off.

United says the reason behind the now infamous video where a passenger was dragged off a flight by law enforcement was because a crew member needed a seat and no one would volunteer to leave.

Airline spokeswoman Maggie Schmerin says that had the staff member been required to check themselves in before the passengers got on the plane, the incident wouldn't have happened. 

"This [policy change] ensures situations like flight 3411 never happen again. This is one of our initial steps in a review of our policies in order to deliver the best customer experience." 

The incident has made waves with other airlines and their policies.

Delta has updated their financial incentive policy to offer up to $9,950 to passengers who volunteer to give up their seats on overbooked flights.

American Airlines changed its conditions as well saying they would not "involuntarily remove a passenger that has already boarded."